Prague’s One World unveils competition titles and underlines festival theme

Prague’s One World unveils competition titles and underlines festival theme

The Painter and the Thief by Benjamin Ree 

Using a tagline of “Not till a hot January”, the theme of the One World Film Festival in 2020 is climate change and its impact on the local landscape.

 

“By combining creative documentaries, accompanying events, and VR projects, we hope to provide a broad overview of the climate crisis – compared to other festivals that also address this subject, the diverse range of perspectives is truly unique,” says the festival’s programming director Ondřej Moravec.

 

“You can attend a workshop on fermenting seasonal vegetables, see a film on environmental racism (a subject almost nobody talks about in our country), explore nature in a dead forest at DOX, or immerse yourself in an emotional VR environment,” she adds. 

 

The festival runs 5-14 March 2020 in Prague before traveling to a further 35 cities across the Czech Republic.

 

Films selected for International Competition are:

 

Acasa, My Home (Romania, Finland, Germany) by Radu Ciorniciuc

 

collective / colectiv (Romania, Luxembourg) by Alexander Nanau

 

Eye to Eye (Finland) by John Webster

 

Mrs. F. (Netherlands, Nigeria) by Chris van der Vorm

 

Ninosca (Sweden) by Peter Torbiornsson

 

Scars (Germany, Poland) by Agniesszka Zwiefka

 

Sing Me A Song (France, Germany, Switzerland) by Thomas Balmes

 

Smog Town (China, Netherlands, South Korea) by Meng Han

 

The Earth is Blue as an Orange (Lithuania, Ukraine) by Iryna Tsilyk

 

The Painter and the Thief (Norway) by Benjamin Ree

 

The Reason I Jump (UK, USA) by Jerry Rothwell

 

The Self Portrait (Norway) by Margreth Olin, Katja Hogseth, Espen Wallin

 

The Train I Ride (France, Finland) Arno Bitschy

 

One World is one of the cornerstones of the People in Need organisation. Since its inception in 1999, it has become the most important festival of its kind in the world and in 2007 it won a special mention from UNESCO for its contribution to human rights education.

 

People in Need was established in 1992 by a group of war correspondents and foreign correspondents who were no longer satisfied with simply bringing back information to the Czech Republic and therefore began sending out aid. People in Need has gradually established itself as a humanitarian organisation that aims to help in troubled regions and to support the observance of human rights around the world.